Research

[PsychToday] Can Moving Together Rhythmically Combat Toddler Selfishness?

July 2, 2014
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Take a moment and think of all the ways we interact rhythmically with children. We rock. We bounce. We dance. We walk. It seems the developmental benefits of this intuitive, simple play may extend farther then we thought.
New Research: Motor Synchrony and Prosocial Development
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Musings on Music and Science

April 16, 2014
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I love quick-and-dirty resources that provide valuable information in an accessible format. In that spirit, I want to share this great resource recently published by the music therapy team at Neurorhythm Music Therapy. Their interactive map of the brain provides brief overviews of music’s effect on different parts of the brain with a click of [...]

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Musings on the State of Music Therapy Research: Strengths, Challenges, and Future Directions

March 18, 2014
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Earlier this month I invited Dr. Michael Anestis, a clinical psychologist and researcher, to share his perspectives on music therapy research. By his own admission, his area of focus is mental health research—which omits the medical, rehabilitation, developmental, wellness, and preventive areas of focus in music therapy research—but I felt he had fair and valid [...]

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[Guest Post] Emerging Research: Music Therapy and Disorders of Consciousness

February 17, 2014
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I first met Julian O’Kelly at the Society for Music Perception and Cognition conference in Toronto last August. Julian is a man of many talents—music therapist, clinician, researcher, PhD student, speaker, and professional pianist. It was through circustance that we ended up co-presenting with our respective PhD mentors at the SMPC conference, but it turned [...]

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[PsychToday] Music, Your GPS Voice, and the Science of Timbre

November 1, 2013
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“Timbre” is a rather difficult-to-define yet hard-to-ignore concept. When it comes to musical timbre, I have described it before as the color of sound. It’s the quality of the sound we hear that helps us differentiate between a flute, a violin, and a tuba . . . Read more
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SMPC 2013 Wrap-up and Reflections

August 13, 2013
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I have recently returned from the 2013 meeting of the Society for Music Perception and Cognition (SMPC), which was held at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada. On the first leg of my return trip, I was asked by the gentleman sitting next to me to share the “one big thing” I learned at this conference.
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[PsychToday] Music, Adaptation, and Evolution

June 14, 2013
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One of the advantages of working on a PhD is that you get to do a lot of reading and re-reading. I find the re-reading more interesting than the initial reading as I read the article or book in a different way, with a different level of depth and understanding.

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[PsychToday] “Thank You Mister Speaker”: On Music and Social Behaviors

May 9, 2013
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Think music doesn’t matter in our lives? You would be hard-pressed to watch this 2 minute clip and not see how music can change the entire mood of a rather serious group of people…Read more
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[PsychToday] Listening to Music Ain’t a Simple Thing

February 14, 2013
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If you were one of the millions who watched the Superbowl halftime show last week, you likely had one of two reactions:
You loved it. Or you hated it.
You simply need to read the headlines to get a sense of the extreme reactions people had to her performance. Some called it electric and thrilling. Others watched [...]

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